Security (S&B/CBRNE) Magazine

Spring 2017

Security & Border Protection and CST & CBRNE Source Book, published jointly, concentrate on WMD response, NGB training, counterterrorism, and border security

Issue link: http://securitybpcstcbrne.epubxp.com/i/817917

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Machines can be replaced, but people can't. In combat, land mine and improvised explosive device (IED) clearance is a slow, painstaking, stressful job that physically and mentally drains Soldiers and military working dogs. U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Yuma, Arizona, has long had the expertise, facilities, and geographical features to test the most cutting-edge technologies to defeat this threat and remove Soldiers from harm's way. Technologies that seek out a variety of explosive hazards and IED components have matured in recent years to the point that semi- autonomous robots can detect, mark, and even destroy buried threats. The latest such system is called the Standoff Robotic Explosive Hazard Detection System (SREHD), and testing is currently underway at the proving ground. "It's one of the few places in the country where we can really get a good evaluation of how the system performs against these varied threats," said Peter Strong, lead engineer. "YPG has lanes that are already planted with explosive targets that allows us to really test our sensors. There is varying terrain, vegetation, and high weather extremes, but also on site are environmental chambers and other infrastructure we need." Multi-Threat Response Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have the bulk of popular awareness, but the danger of conventional mines to Soldiers remains as great as ever. Though the vast majority of the world's nations have banned anti-personnel mines, over 30 countries have not signed the treaty to cease manufacture and use of the weapons. Additionally, many places in the world are contaminated by devices that are decades old. In Afghanistan, for example, United States forces contended with an estimated 10 million such legacy mines, as well as new devices placed by insurgents. DEFINITIVE DETECTION DOWN RANGE The U.S. Army is working to field a new robotic system that finds and destroys explosive threats. By Mark Schauer, Yuma Proving Ground U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground has long had the expertise, facilities, and geographical features to test the most cutting-edge technologies to defeat the threat of buried explosives and remove Soldiers from harm's way. Technologies that seek out a variety of explosive hazards and IED components have matured in recent years to the point that semi-autonomous robots like the Standoff Robotic Explosive Hazard Detection System (SREHD) can detect, mark, and even destroy buried threats. (Photo by Mark Schauer) GROUND ROBOTICS IMPROVED EXPLOSIVE DETECTION/ELIMINATION www.tacticaldefensemedia.com 26 | S&BP and CST & CBRNE | Spring 2017

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